Author Topic: Welding electrodes and what these numbers mean !!  (Read 2279 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline rogers5656

  • Site Helper
  • Full Member
  • *
  • Posts: 190
  • Thanks for Post +34/-0
  • Last Login:July 18, 2013, 06:02:35 AM
  • 100th Forum Member
Welding electrodes and what these numbers mean !!
« on: December 16, 2012, 04:31:32 PM »
To stop seeing these ads when your viewing the first post, Please Register to see more of the forum.
 
For newbies, the use of different welding electrodes can be sometimes confusing, so let's talk about this welding electrodes, what to use in general, what's best for penetration and possible the right sequence during the welding process. Here I will discuss the usual and available rods that I have in stock being only a hobby welder, like the E6011, E6013, E7018 and E7024. I know the pros or the serious fabricators here surely know this already and probably used other types of welding electrode possibly the likes of E6010, E6012, E6022, E6027, E7010 E7014, E7018, E7022, and others, etc etc.


E6011 Welding Electrode : 

E6011 ELECTRODES ----- This type of electrode can be used with an AC or DC currents, but ideal for use on AC welders. It works well on dirty,rusty or painted metals. This can also be used in all kinds of welding positions. Amperage for this type of welding electrode is from 110 amps to 180 amps. This rods are usually used for root passes.




WIPWELD and SOUDOWELD 1/8" diam. welding electrodes.



E6013 Welding Electrodes :

E6013 ELECTRODES ----- This type of welding electrodes can be used with an AC or DC currents. This is what I use for general repairs for light thickness fabrication. It produces a medium penetrating weld but with a superior weld bead appearance. The usual amperage setting for this kind of welding rods is 75 amps to 140 amps. Usually used for general welding and capping.



These are the E6013s  3/32 rods from NIHONWELD, above and BESTWELD, below.


And these are the E6013s  1/8 rods from APOLLO, above and WIPCORD, below.



E7018 Welding Electrodes :

E7018 ELECTRODES ----- DC TYPE WELDING ELECTRODE-- Designed mainly for DC welders. It produces a high quality welds for mild steel, and ideal for carbon steel where cracking is a concern. This electrode can produce welds of X-RAY quality but with medium penetration. This type of welding rods should be kept in a sealed container or an electrode oven when not in use. Usually this type of welding electrodes are used for hot passes. And the usual amperage setting ranges from 120 amps to 180amps or more.
                             ------ AC TYPE WELDING ELECTRODE -- Designed for AC welder operation, preferred for its high purity and crack resistant welds on mild and carbon steels. This rod is also known as a low hydrogen electrode. This kind of electrode must be kept dry at all times but if it gets wet, it must be dried in an ELECTRODE OVEN for at least 30 minutes before use.
This type of welding electrodes, the DC and AC are good for hot passes.





These are the two types of E7018 rods, the DC and AC welding electrodes.



E7024 Welding Electrodes :

E7024 ELECTRODES ----- Known as the drag rod, is designed for fast-production mild steel welding. It can be used for DC as well as AC current, it welds satisfactorily on horizontal position but best for flat position. Produces less weld spatters during weld applications due to the high percentage of iron powder in the flux. And usual amperage setting varies from 115 amps to 180 amps.



These rods are much thicker in flux covering and longer than the ordinary rods like the E6013 and others.


This image is just a comparison in terms of diameter between a 3/32" rod, the 1/8" 6013 and the 1/8" 7024.   :D






`


Offline rogers5656

  • Site Helper
  • Full Member
  • *
  • Posts: 190
  • Thanks for Post +34/-0
  • Last Login:July 18, 2013, 06:02:35 AM
  • 100th Forum Member
Re: Welding electrodes and what these numbers mean !!
« Reply #1 on: December 16, 2012, 04:52:27 PM »

OK before I go to the meaning of numbers stamped or printed on several welding electrodes, I would like first to touch or discuss the different welding positions needed for welding applications and I firmly believe these positions are worth learning too plus these welding positions are also related to the electrode numbering.



FLAT WELDING POSITION :
 Welding in this position is commonly known as the *1G, a welding application on plate joints or other rebars.,
* 1F, a welding application on a V shaped metal joints, similar to an inverted T-joint.,
* 1G Pipe, a welding application on a pipe horizontally rolled, its like rotating the pipes being joined to a clockwise or counter cloclwise and depositing the weld at or near the top.

This is the most basic and easiest welding position there is.


HORIZONTAL WELDING POSITION :
 Welding in this position is known as the *2G, the plates or bars to be welded are on a standing or vertical position and the weld application is applied horizontally.,
*2F, a welding application on a standing or erect position of a T joint for example and still the axis of weld is horizontal.,
*2G Pipe, a welding position when the pipes to be joined is in a vertical or standing position, still the weld application is horizontal.

This position is slightly harder to do than the flat weld position as gravity is trying to pull the molten metal down towards the ground, but with continues practice, it will still be easy to do.


VERTICAL WELDING POSITION :
Welding in this position is commonly known as *3G, weld applications here is done in a vertical manner, going up in this position is known as Vertical Up weld, and going down in this position is known as Vertical Down weld. Plates to be joined here is in a vertical position.,
*3F, weld application here is the same like the 3G but the difference in the metal joint being welded. It is like a T joint where the metal is in a standing or erect position and weld is applied on the most corner joint of the metal in a vertical up or vertical down manner.,
*5G Pipe, a welding position on a pipe that is horizontally fixed, weld application on the joint is from the top going down and overhead, the same on the other side. Note here that the pipe is fixed and shall not or cannot be rotated when welding.

This is one position that many encounter difficulty specially the vertical up weld due to gravity compared to the vertical down weld which is easier to control. This kind of application has a limited penetration.


OVERHEAD WELDING POSITION :
Welding in this position is known as just that, above the head welding applications. But also known or referred as to the
*4G, the plates here to be welded is positioned overhead or above the head and weld application is usually in a horizontal manner.,
*4F, this is similar to the T joint literally where in the joint to be welded is overhead or above the head and the weld is applied in the very corner of the metal joint and the axis of weld is horizontal.
*6G, this pipe welding position, is an overhead or above the head weld application and the pipe is fixed and cannot be rotated.



Offline rogers5656

  • Site Helper
  • Full Member
  • *
  • Posts: 190
  • Thanks for Post +34/-0
  • Last Login:July 18, 2013, 06:02:35 AM
  • 100th Forum Member
Re: Welding electrodes and what these numbers mean !!
« Reply #2 on: December 16, 2012, 05:26:09 PM »
An additional info here regarding weld positions and sort of terminology following each weld position. I think this is also worth understanding and perhaps remembering.

There are four basic welding positions or orientations that have been defined by the AWS (American Welding Society), and they are FLAT (1), HORIZONTAL (2), VERTICAL (3), and OVERHEAD (4) . These positions are designated by the numbers that relate to the position followed by a letter that designate the type of weld.

And what are these letters, well its the ( G ) and ( F ). The letter G, stands for GROOVE and the letter F, stands for FILLET.


Now WHAT IS A GROOVE WELD ??

Groove weld is a weld made in the groove between two plates to be joined. The groove weld is commonly used to make edge to edge joints although it is also often used in corner joints, T joints and joints between curved and flat pieces. There are many ways to make groove weld, the differences depending primarily on the geometry of the parts to be joined and preparation of their edges. Weld metal is deposited within the groove and penetrates and fuses with the base metal to form the joint. Sourced from GAWDA.wiki.


Here are some line drawing illustrations I made for better understanding and visualizations.


1G, FLAT POSITION


2G, HORIZONTAL POSITION


3G, VERTICAL POSITION


4G, OVERHEAD POSITION



WHAT IS A FILLET WELD ??

A Fillet weld is the most common type of weld. It is used to join two pieces of flat plate steel at a 90 degree angle. A Fillet weld overhead position is produced by running a weld bead at 45 degree angle to a 90 degree corner. It resembles a triangle when viewed from the side. Fillet weld is the most basic of welds, it is used to make lap joints, corner joints, corner joints and T joints. Sourced from WiseGeek.


Here are some line drawing illustrations again for better understanding and visualizations.


1F, FLAT POSITION


2F, HORIZONTAL POSITION


3F, VERTICAL POSITION


4F, OVERHEAD POSITION



I hope with these simple graphic illustrations we can now easily understand the meaning of these several positions being described as with GROOVES and FILLETS !
Tomorrow, the meaning of these numbers printed on the welding rods.



TO BE CONTINUED and thanks for viewing........................................... ;D  ;)





Offline rogers5656

  • Site Helper
  • Full Member
  • *
  • Posts: 190
  • Thanks for Post +34/-0
  • Last Login:July 18, 2013, 06:02:35 AM
  • 100th Forum Member
Re: Welding electrodes and what these numbers mean !!
« Reply #3 on: December 19, 2012, 09:45:06 AM »
OK, now I will share some electrode identifications and what those numbers means printed on the welding rods/electrodes particularly the E6011, E6013, E7018 and E7024 rods. I will be specific on these four welding rods only since these are what I have in hand. The info I will share will be based on the writings made by BRUCE BAUERLEIN's " A Basic Guide of Arc Welding Electrodes ".
Arc welding electrodes are identified using the A.W.S. ( American Welding Society ) numbering system and are made in sizes from 1/16" to 5/16" diameter rods. Let's take for example a welding rod identified as 1/8" E6011 electrode :


E6011 electrode, 1/8" :

1/8" ------------ stands for the diameter of the electrode without the flux coating.

" E " ------------ stands for the arc welding electrode.

" 60 " ------------ stands for the minimum tensile strength of 60,000 psi (per square inch).

" 1 " ------------ stands for the welding position, which means this rod can be used for all
welding positions, flat, horizontal, vertical ( UP or DOWN ) and overhead.

" 1 " ------------ this last digit stands for the type of coating in various welding electrodes.
meaning this rod has a coating of cellulose Potassium with a welding
current for AC or DC .

This E6011 rod is usually used for root passes because of its deep penetrating welds.


E6013 electrode, 1/8" :

1/8" ------------ diameter of the welding rod without the flux coating.

" E " ------------ stands for the arc welding electrode.

"60 " ------------ stands for the minimum tensile strength of 60,000 psi (per square inch).

" 1 " ------------ stands for all welding positions, good for flat, horizontal, vertical, overhead.

" 3 " ------------ this last digit stands for the type of coating it carries, titania potassium with a welding current for AC or DC.

This E6013 rod is a general purpose electrode that produces a medium penetrating weld but with a superior weld bead appearance.


E7018 electrode, 1/8" :

1/8" ------------ stands for the diameter of the rod without the flux coating.

" E " ------------ stands for the arc welding electrode.

"70 " ------------ stands for the minimum tensile strength of 70,000 psi (per square inch).

" 1 " ------------ stands for the welding position, can be used for flat, horizontal, vertical
and overhead welding positions.

" 8 " ------------ this no. stands for the type of coating it carries, iron powder, low
hydrogen with a welding current of AC or DC.

This E7018 rod is usually used for hot passes, preferred for its high purity, crack resistant welds on mild and carbon steel. This rod must be kept dry at all times and if it gets wet, must be dried in a rod oven for at least 30 minutes before use.


E7024 electrode, 1/8" :


1/8" ------------ stands for the diameter of the rod without the flux coating.

"E"  ------------  stands for the arc welding electrode.

"70" -----------  stands for the minimum tensile strength of 70,000 psi(per square inch).

"2"  ------------  stands for the welding position, butt or fillet welding in flat and horizontal positions.

"4"  ------------  this last digit stands for the type of coating it carries, iron powder titanium oxide, can be used both on AC or DC (DCEP, DCEN) welding current.

This E7024 rod is of high efficient carbon steel electrode and very suitable for butt or fillet welding. Personally I am beginning to like this electrode as sort of a substitute to E6013 in terms of tensile strength.   

 

NOTE !!!
The thicker the material to be welded, the higher the current is needed and the larger the electrode may be required.

But for more specific information pls see PDF REFERANCE LIBRARY below the index and check out Admin's thread,
" Welding Techniques and Concerns " .